2017’s Top Kitchen Design Trends

While a home’s curb appeal may draw buyers in, its interior matters just as much, if not more. Several features are high on the wish list of today’s homebuyer, including a modern kitchen. Whether you’re thinking of starting a remodel or you’re just curious about what the future holds, check out these trends that turn kitchens into buyer bait.

Hidden appliances: Upgrading appliances is one of the quickest ways to add value to a kitchen. If you’re looking to impress a buyer with deep pockets, look into hidden appliances. What’s the appeal? Less obvious appliances keep the eye on the kitchen’s overall flow and design.

Personalized pantries: The utilitarian kitchen pantry has evolved into a trending design element. Whether you choose a pocket door and complementary light fixture or a rustic barn door and wallpaper, there’s no shortage of ways to express your personal style.

Creative countertops: Looking for a revamp with an immediate impact? Upgrade the counters. Quartz and butcher block, both easy to maintain, are quickly replacing traditional marble and granite surfaces. You can dress up your kitchen further with sleek waterfall-edge countertops that extend vertically to the floor.

Mixed-up metal accents: Accessorizing with different finishes is a trendy, cost-effective way to update your kitchen. In addition to stainless steel and gold, homebuilders are seeing copper accents emerging as the metallic detail of choice.

Don’t let a dated kitchen cost you when it’s time to sell your home. Incorporating a trend or two could be enough to give your kitchen the face-lift it needs to entice buyers.


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Featured Image Credit: “The Kitchen: Chapter Six (Final Reveal!)” by Emily May © 2014 (CC BY 2.0)

Credit Score: What It Means and How to Improve It

Are you considering making a major purchase, like buying a home, this year? If so, your credit score will likely come into play. An understanding of the basics can help you effectively monitor and manage it.

Credit Score 101
Your credit score will usually range from 300 to 850. It’s derived from an algorithm that takes into account several factors, including payment history, the total debt owed and length of credit history.

Lenders use this three-digit number to predict risk and the likelihood that you’ll repay your debt on time. The higher your credit score, the less risk you are and the lower your loan terms will be. For example, a person with a “good” credit score of 700 may have a lower interest rate and smaller required down payment than someone with a “poor” credit score of 400.

How to Improve Your Score
If you don’t have much credit history or you have a few negatives on your report, consider these strategies to increase your score.

  • Pay all of your bills on time. Late payments can negatively impact your score.
  • Pay off debt where you can. The less debt you have, the lower your debt-to-income ratio.
  • Keep your credit card balances as low as possible, aiming to use no more than 30 percent of your available credit. And pay off as much as you can each month since higher balances can sink your score.
  • Review your credit report at least annually, and keep an eye out for mistakes and identity theft.

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Featured Image Credit: “Excellent Credit Score” by CafeCredit.com © 2016 (CC BY 2.0)

How to Be Prepared for an Emergency

Do you know what vital information to have on hand in the event of a natural disaster or family emergency? When an unexpected situation arises, there’s no time to sort through paperwork, no matter how essential it may be. Having everything you need in an organized emergency binder can streamline the process and give you peace of mind.

What to Include in an Emergency Binder
While there’s no shortage of important family documents and household records, a true emergency calls for a few must-haves:

  • Vital records like birth certificates, driver’s licenses, Social Security cards, naturalization documents, passports and child custody papers.
  • Insurance policies, including homeowners, renters, auto, life and health.
  • Property records such as real estate deeds, rental agreements, and vehicle titles and registration.
  • Financial documents like wills, trusts, powers-of-attorney and funeral instructions.
  • A family emergency plan with contact information and predetermined meeting places.

Safely Storing Other Important Information
Some items, such as account passwords and a backup of critical computer files, aren’t suited for a portable binder. Instead, house them in a secure location like a safety deposit box or lockbox. You can also include a home inventory list, contracts, business paperwork, tax returns and investment records.

Play it safe and include a recent photograph of every family member, along with fingerprints and dental records. You may also want to store valuable memorabilia, jewelry, and priceless family photos, letters and documents here as well.

There’s no way to predict when misfortune will strike, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be prepared. Set aside an afternoon to create an emergency binder that can help protect your family when time is of the essence.


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Featured Image Credit: “Better work flow: get organized” by Jodimichelle © 2011 (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Downtown St. Paul: Revisited

Every January, talk of “New Year, New Me” abounds, so we figured now would be a great time to revisit one of our very first featured neighborhoods, Downtown St. Paul, to see what has changed since we last visited in February 2014. As it turns out, a lot has changed in three years – the Metro Transit Green Line opened in June 2014 and has since served millions of passengers; the State Capitol building has undergone a massive $310 million restoration (due to be completed by August 2017); and dozens of other development projects, both large and small, have popped up in the capital city. As its twin city, Minneapolis, gears up to host Super Bowl LII a year from now with its own bevy of renovation projects, St. Paul is also tidying up and polishing the fine china to welcome the big crowds that are expected.

With a “crumbling exterior” and “antiquated infrastructure,” the Capitol building was long overdue for some major reconstruction. After 100 years of use, what else would you expect? So in the past three years, the building has experienced a comprehensive renovation – updates include everything from exterior modifications to safety enhancements and increased energy efficiency. Behind-the-scenes photos of the process can be seen here. The project is expected to reach completion in August of this year, which will be celebrated with a free multi-day event for the public to kick off the site’s next 100 years of service.

  

As is typical in most major metropolitan areas, condos, lofts, and apartments are the downtown’s prevalent housing styles. Conversion and restoration projects throughout the neighborhood over the past year or so, have resulted in hundreds of additional units coming on to the market (with more on the way). In December 2016 alone, there were forty condo units listed for sale (compared to 25 in Downtown Minneapolis). With a relatively low median sales price ($169,900 compared to $261,950 in Downtown West and $514,000 for Downtown East, see chart below), buying a condo in Downtown St. Paul is a smart investment, especially because of the access to a strong job market, burgeoning recreational opportunities, and convenient public transportation.  

A great transit system factors into the decision for many to choose Downtown St. Paul as their home. Fortunately, Metro Transit fits the bill, having received the Outstanding Public Transportation System Achievement Award from the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) last year. With at least 20 bus routes traveling through the Downtown on a daily basis, it is well connected to the rest of the Twin Cities, including suburbs such as Maplewood, Lino Lakes, and Stillwater. The successful addition of the Green Line in 2014 has made it even easier for residents and visitors from anywhere in the metro to check out all of Downtown’s new offerings.

  

The Lowertown area has experienced some of the most growth as of late, especially when it comes to the foodie scene. Favorite newcomers include Public Kitchen and Bar and Dark Horse Bar and Eatery. Also relatively new to the area is The Buttered Tin, a café and bakery which is part of the Wacouta Commons Park district.

Another recent Lowertown addition is CHS Field, home of the St. Paul Saints baseball team. Opened in 2015, the stadium has hosted much more than ball games, including corporate events, concerts, even weddings! And of course you can’t forget one of Twin Cities most popular events, the Cat Video Festival, which relocated last year from the Walker Art Center.  

St. Paul is a haven for the culturally-inclined, brimming with art galleries, music and dance venues, museums, and, of course, some of the most historic theaters in the state. Until just last year, the Palace Theatre – which first opened in 1916 – had not been in regular use for nearly 40 years. Just before being condemned, the building was purchased by the City of St. Paul and refreshed (to the tune of $15.6 million over two years) to become one of the Twin Cities’ premier destinations for contemporary music and entertainment. Built in 1910, the Fitzgerald Theater (originally the Shubert Theater, then later renamed after the literary great, and St. Paul native, F. Scott) is the oldest active theater in the city. The venue is known for hosting Minnesota Public Radio, along with concerts and “Films at the Fitz.” While not quite as old as the Palace or the Fitzgerald, the Ordway Center for the Performing Arts is just as culturally significant to the fabric of St. Paul, being recognized as one of the U.S.’s leading not-for-profit performing arts centers. The Ordway went through its own two-year update, completed in 2015. One of the biggest annual attractions is the Flint Hills International Children’s Festival, which takes place in June. Lastly, if you haven’t seen or been inside the Landmark Center (built in 1902 and located just across the street from Rice Park), then you are missing out. From its instantly recognizable pink granite exterior, to the green turrets and red tiled roof, to the marble and mahogany interior, the architecture represents the best of the city. Definitely come for a tour of the building, and stay for the impressive performances and exhibits.

Theaters are not the only way to take in St. Paul’s culture – there are many museums, as well, and they are experiencing their own rejuvenations. As part of the Pioneer Endicott/Empire Building’s larger renovation plans, the Minnesota Museum of American Art is set for a major expansion in the months to come. Meanwhile, work on the Children’s Museum, is nearing completion (it’s expected to be wrapped up by April 2017). The $30 million update includes a four-story climbing structure and an expanded gallery for air and water play.

  

Until then (and beyond), the Science Museum is another great option for those who like their museums to be interactive, educational, and fun. As the most popular museum in the Upper Midwest, it takes this distinction seriously, offering a myriad of diverting shows, exhibits (dinosaurs!), and artifacts – the Omnitheater is a guaranteed crowd-pleaser! History buffs will particularly enjoy the exhibit and views of the Mississippi River. Speaking of history lovers, just head north on Kellogg Blvd. to the Minnesota History Center for a walk through our state’s past. Home to the Minnesota Historical Society, the center has permanent and changing exhibits and hosts concerts, lectures, family days and other special events throughout the year.

Through all the changes the city has seen recently, though, there are iconic unchanging landmarks and events that will forever define St. Paul. For example, the Winter Carnival (being held Jan. 26th-Feb. 5th), is now over 130 years old, and can call itself the country’s oldest winter festival (predating the Tournament of Roses Festival by two years). Each year, the festivities attract more than 250,000 visitors from near and far, which helps boost the local economy. From the ice castle and snow sculptures to the Grand Day parade and Winter Jazz Festival to the Beer Dabbler and Vulcan Torchlight parade, there’s nothing you won’t enjoy about this St. Paul tradition. If we have to brave the Minnesota winters each year, we might as well make the most of them, right?  

Union Depot is one of the many venues for Winter Carnival events, playing host to the “paw-some” Doggie Depot day. There are many events held at the depot throughout the rest of the year as well, including weddings, cultural festivals, and holiday celebrations. With the full calendar, it’s easy to forget that on a day-to-day basis (since 1913), the depot actually functions as a working transit station, with connections to local and regional buses, light rail, and Amtrak trains. Like many other St. Paul buildings from last century, the depot underwent a two-year transformation in 2010-2012, making it the architectural wonder we know and love today.

From the depot, we recommend taking some time to navigate through the labyrinth of Skyways – you never know what you might find along the way. During our trip, we came across the TPT studios and the adorably cozy café Per.ke.lat. However, if you’ve ever ended up in the so-called “Skyway to Nowhere,” we feel your pain and are sure you’re happy to know that the divisive landmark will soon be demolished.

Mickey’s Diner is another St. Paul institution. Featured in numerous movies and TV shows, the art-deco dining car is recognized and beloved far beyond the city’s borders. The 50-foot-long diner sits on the unassuming corner of West 7th and St. Peter Street, and while the city has built up around it, the legendary eatery has been preserved for almost 70 years, and has remained family-owned and operated for three generations.  

In recent years, the landscape of St. Paul has certainly experienced a lot of change. But through it all, the heart and soul of the city remain, and it will be “Forever Saint Paul.”

 

Top Three Methods for Clearing Clutter in 2017

The new year represents a clean slate and the chance to begin again. It’s also the ideal time to clear out unwanted items and organize your home for the year ahead. If you want a fresh start to 2017, let these decluttering approaches inspire you.

Organizational Apps
Decluttering apps are plentiful, and they provide an effective way to complete the purging process. Some, like Snupps, let you digitize your belongings and organize them into simple categories or “shelves.” From there, you decide what to keep, sell or give away. You can also reach out to other users for organizational inspiration, discover items you may be interested in acquiring or show off your personal collection.

Room-by-Room Schedule
To systematically remove clutter over time, try monthly organization that’s broken down by room. For example, you can tackle the kitchen in January and give the home office a deep clean in February. Make a schedule that works for you. This method may feel less overwhelming and rushed.

Single Purge
Prefer to declutter your entire home all at once? Designate a few days or a weekend to devote to the process. The secret is to stay focused on one task at a time and avoid getting sidetracked. Work your way through each room one by one until you’ve cleared out all areas of your home.

The new year is fast approaching and now’s the time to eliminate your clutter. Whether it’s an app, a 12-month schedule or one big purge, there’s no shortage of methods to help you have a more organized 2017.


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Featured Image Credit: “an organized craft room” by alison headley © 2010 (CC BY 2.0)

Loring Park, Minneapolis

It’s the most wonderful time of the year…to visit Loring Park. The park has served as home to one of the Twin Cities’ most beloved holiday traditions, Holidazzle, since the event relocated from Nicollet Mall in 2015. A celebration of all things holiday and all things Minneapolis, Holidazzle brings together local vendors, ice skating, music, and movies to equal winter fun for all ages.

Another cold weather favorite is Winterfest, held annually in February: a night of caroling, carriage rides, crafting, and ice skating. Even though the holidays will be over by then, there’s no reason you can’t keep the festive spirit alive all winter long!

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If venturing out in the -20 degree weather isn’t exactly your cup of tea, Loring Park is luckily beautiful to visit no matter the time of year. In the spring and summer, the Garden of the Seasons is in full bloom and features colorful florals and perennials, as well as wildlife (including the adorable resident albino squirrel!). A part of the #1 park system in America, Loring Park also boasts a nice-sized dog park and the Loring Community Arts Center, offering recreational programs (from cooking to yoga) and playing host to private events and receptions. Moreover, each summer, the park attracts large crowds for the Twin Cities Pride Festival and the Loring Park Arts Festival.

Originally called Central Park (yes, like that park in New York City), the park was renamed in 1890 to honor Charles Morgridge Loring, who was the first president of the park board in Minneapolis and is nicknamed the “Father of Minneapolis Parks.” Loring is largely responsible for negotiating the acquisition of large plots of private land throughout the city, especially along lake shorelines, and converting it to public parks in the 1880s.

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Beyond the edges of the park itself is the rest of the neighborhood, which extends north to 394, west and south to I-94, and east to Highway 65 and 12th St. One of the neighborhood’s most photogenic sites is, of course, the Basilica of St. Mary. Known as “America’s first basilica,” St. Mary’s has hosted the Basilica Block Party each year since 1995, to raise funds to restore and preserve the historic landmark. With big name acts such as The Fray, Death Cab for Cutie, and Weezer taking the stage in the past, the Block Party is always one of the city’s biggest events of the summer.

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Another recognizable neighborhood landmark is the Minneapolis Community & Technical College, colloquially known as MCTC. In 2014, the school celebrated 100 years of educational service to the diverse downtown community. Now covering more than 21 acres of land, MCTC enrolls nearly 13,000 students each year, which is about 5,000 more people than the entire neighborhood’s population!

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Speaking of the local populace, many Loring Park residents are below age 34, married with no children, and are employed in health care or professional fields. These people in particular seem to be attracted to the neighborhood because of its proximity to downtown amenities and available housing styles, consisting mostly of condos, lofts, townhouses, and apartments – suitable to their childless and busy lifestyles (multi-family homes often require less maintenance than single family homes).

As you can see in the chart above, inventory is at its lowest point since June 2013, with just about 20 townhouse or condo units currently for sale. While the neighborhood is known for its characteristic brownstones, in recent years, there has also been an uptick in development of modern lofts and condos to keep up with demand (there’s always more room to build upward rather than outward). With a median sales price of $230,000, the neighborhood is relatively well-priced compared to the city as a whole, making it a popular place to settle for young professionals.

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Along with new development, hip eateries and breweries such as Lakes and Legends, are bringing new energy to the neighborhood. Lakes and Legends Brewing Company, which just celebrated its first anniversary last week, often hosts community-centric events and markets that promote local artisans. Likewise, 4 Bells and The Third Bird draw a sophisticated yet relaxed clientele, with inviting venues and innovative yet accessible menus.

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Even with all the popular newcomers, though, longtime staples such as The Nicollet Diner and Salsa a la Salsa still attract a loyal fanbase by offering delicious food at reasonable prices. Additionally, Cafe and Bar Lurcat is as much a favorite of critics as it is of swanky foodies, having won numerous awards over the 15 years it’s been open. It is admittedly pricier than other restaurants nearby, but the ambiance and cuisine surely justify the higher price point.

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Brides-to-be have plenty of reason to visit Loring Park, with several bridal boutiques located in the neighborhood, such as a and bé and Che Bella (both pictured above) and annual bridal shows held at the Convention Center. There are also many churches, venues, and restaurants that are perfect for ceremonies and receptions in a nice central location. The nearby hotels, such as the Hyatt Regency and Millennium Hotel, are ideal for weddings – from hosting bridal parties to receptions to rooms for out-of-town guests and bride and groom suites.

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Speaking of the Minneapolis Convention Center, it is certainly one of the most well-known features of the Loring Park neighborhood. Each year, the venue (with 475,000 square feet of exhibit space and 87 meeting rooms) holds hundreds of events, ranging from business meetings to private parties, the aforementioned bridal shows to home expos, ComicCon and beyond. If you’ve never been to the center in person, it’s definitely worth a visit, as the size, service, and happenings are all quite impressive.

Are you a resident of Loring Park, or thinking about moving to the area? Let us know in the comment section below!

Neighborhood Resources

Neighborhood Schools

Public Parks & Attractions

Child Garden Montessori School Loring Greenway
 Emerson Spanish Immersion Learning Center Loring Park
Rayito de Sol  Minneapolis Convention Center

Faith Communities

Local Restaurants

Basilica of St. Mary  4 Bells
 Central Lutheran Church  19 Bar
Episcopal Church in Minnesota  Asian Taste
 Hennepin Avenue United Methodist Church Cafe & Bar Lurcat
Saint Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral Eli’s Food & Cocktails
Westminster Presbyterian Church Espresso Royale Cafe
Wooddale Church Jerusalem’s Restaurant
Lotus Vietnamese Restaurant
Market Bar-B-Que
 Muffin Top Café
North 45 Restaurant and Bar
Ping’s Szechuan Bar & Grill
Ryan’s Pub
Salsa a La Salsa
The Nicollet Diner
The Third Bird

Cleaning Tips for Your Four Hardest Working Home Appliances

Occasionally cleaning household appliances like stoves and refrigerators may seem obvious, but what about equipment that does the cleaning, like the dishwasher and washing machine? Give these often overlooked appliances a deep clean with the following tips before the holidays have them working overtime.

Unclog the dishwasher. The cleaner the dishwasher, the cleaner your dishes will turn out after going through a wash cycle. Take a moment to clean the dishwasher’s filter, usually located on the inside bottom of the machine. This detachable filter becomes clogged with food and debris over time, so empty it out regularly to keep it working efficiently.

De-gunk your garbage disposal. Use a natural abrasive combo of ice and salt to loosen grime from the blades. Though it will be loud, run the disposal until the ice is gone. When finished, you can grind up a lemon or lime wedge to deodorize the drain.

Give your washing machine a wash. Hosting out-of-towners during the holiday season? Avoid musty bedding and towels by sanitizing the machine and removing mildew buildup every few months. To do this, run a hot wash cycle without a load and add one cup of bleach to the soap dispenser or directly into the machine.

Give your vacuum more power. Increased foot traffic could have this tool working harder over the holidays. Keep your vacuum maintained with simple fixes like unclogging hoses, cleaning the rotating brush and replacing the filter.

Want to keep your appliances working hard for you? Give them regular attention and their own cleaning now and then.


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Featured Image Credit: “Washing Machine” by Christina Welsh © 2011 (CC BY-ND 2.0)

How to Throw a Seamless Dinner Party

Think being a good host means stressing in the kitchen while your guests enjoy the party? Think again. With a little advanced preparation, you can unlock the secrets of a stress-free holiday get-together.

Plan and Practice the Menu
Choose dishes that don’t have to be served piping hot, like lasagna, quiches and braised stews. Test out new recipes in advance so you can make necessary adjustments to the ingredients and perfect your prep time. Once you’ve got the menu figured out, prepare what you can ahead of time. Ready entire courses that will keep for a day; then heat them up just before your guests are set to arrive.

Don’t Forget the Drinks
Serving a signature holiday cocktail, whether it’s alcoholic or family-friendly, can simplify your hosting process. If you can, find one that can be premixed and served from a pitcher. Chill other beverages in an ice-filled tub to keep your refrigerator food-focused, and position the drink station opposite the food buffet to create a nice flow and avoid bottlenecks. This will help cut back on the number of people congregating in and around the kitchen.

Aim for Easy Cleanup
Plan out the number of serving dishes you’ll need in advance, and borrow from family and friends to supplement what you have. Want to reduce your dish-washing burden? Serve hors d’oeuvres, which can be filling and require little more than a napkin. If you do opt to use dinnerware, begin the party with an empty dishwasher so you clear plates and glasses as soon as guests have finished.

These tips will help you enjoy your gathering without the typical hosting hassles.


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Featured Image Credit: “Happy Thanksgiving everyone!” by Satya Murthy © 2010 (CC BY 2.0)

Chaska, MN

If you were in the vicinity of the southwest metro area this past September, there’s a high likelihood that you were impacted by some little event called the Ryder Cup. An estimated 250,000 fans (more than ten times the city’s year-round population) flocked to Chaska’s Hazeltine National Golf Club and the surrounding area to take part in the historic tournament with big name golfers including Phil Mickelson, Rory McIlroy, and Sergio Garcia. With a long-awaited U.S. victory on a course specifically designed to play to the American team’s strengths, Hazeltine (and subsequently Chaska) are officially on the map!

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But even after all the crowds and camera crews departed (and, indeed, long before they arrived), Hazeltine is and has been the midwest’s premier destination for major championship golf. Lush grounds and beautiful landscaping make it an ideal choice for a picturesque day at the links along with exclusive private events such as weddings and corporate parties.

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Speaking of scenic venues, the Oak Ridge Hotel and Conference Center attracts many to its lakeside facilities each year. (Undoubtedly, many of those Ryder Cup visitors had their reservations there.) Situated on 130 scenic acres on Lake McKnight, it’s easy to see why many choose Oak Ridge for their wedding locale or company retreat. But even if you’re just looking to escape from the hustle and bustle of the Twin Cities, the center acts as an idyllic, serene getaway.

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If you’re looking to get away without ever leaving Chaska, though, a visit to the Chaska History Center will serve as a journey through time. Step inside the signature brick building and you’ll find everything from Native American artifacts to newspaper copies dating back to 1862 (10 years after the city’s founding). See the genealogical history of a dozen of Chaska’s oldest families, or take a look through photos depicting what life was like long before the advent of computers and cellphones (and remind your kids that, yes, there was a time before computers and cellphones).

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Because of its small town feeling, it’s easy to forget that Chaska is a good-sized suburb with a lot of variety to offer, especially when it comes to entertainment and dining.

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For starters, there’s the Chaska Curling Center. Opened in December of 2015, the center is currently home to the nation’s largest curling membership. What can we say? We Minnesotans definitely love our sports on ice! Spectators who prefer frosty mugs to frosty shoes can watch all the action from the toasty comfort of the attached Crooked Pint Ale House. Also adjacent to the Curling Center is the Chaska Event Center, another popular venue for wedding receptions.  

One of the city’s favorite destinations for families is the Chaska Valley Family Theater. Since its first production in 1996, the theater has been delighting audiences of all ages with traditional musicals featuring members of the local community. But over the years, a handful of plucky playwrights from the area have been given the opportunity to present their original works on the CVFT stage, much to the enjoyment of their local adoring fans.

Foodies can also rejoice, because there is no shortage of options when it’s time to chow down. From old-fashioned diners and malt shops, to Chinese, Italian, Japanese, and Mexican cuisine, there’s something to please everyone in the family.

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The diversity in eateries reflects the city’s growing – and changing – populace. Like its northeastern neighbor Chanhassen, Chaska has really seen a population boom over the last few decades. In the last sixteen years alone, the population has grown by nearly 40%. To keep up with demand, as the population increases at a rate of about 500 households per year (with an expected peak in 2025), new development is on the rise. New build neighborhoods such as Chevalle, The Harvest, and Symphony Hills have sprung up all over town, resulting in a median home age of just 28 years. Tellingly, in the past six months, a majority of sold homes were under 20 years old. 

Over the last two years, Chaska’s median estimated home value has grown from $235,000 to $275,000. Compared to the entirety of Carver County, the rate of increase is about twice as fast.

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No doubt, contributing to that impressive increase is the sale of many new construction homes within the past 12 months alone, most with 3-4+ bedrooms and 2000-2500 sq. ft. This typical home size is understandable as a majority of Chaska households are made up of married couples with adolescent and teenage children.

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In spite of the city’s increasing population, though, Chaska has been able to successfully maintain its small town feel through the concentrated efforts of the City Council. After all, the city’s mission is to be the “best small town in Minnesota.” Indeed, in 2007, Money Magazine even ranked Chaska as the #8 best small town in the entire country. This accomplishment was achieved, in part, through seasonal community events such as River City Days and the Turkey Trot (coming up this weekend!). Organized efforts like Christmas in May also add to the feelings of closeness and camaraderie within the community.

As you can see, Chaska has a vibe all its own. Many may be tempted to write it off as just another stuffy suburb, but they’d be mistaken. Chaska has the warm inviting feel of a small town – compounded by its charming downtown area (complete with gazebo and historic mill) – while enjoying big city amenities in neighboring towns. Also home to the world’s largest mustache, Chaska brings a funky freshness to the ‘burban world!

Neighborhood Resources

Neighborhood Schools

Public Parks & Attractions

District 112: Eastern Carver County Schools See a full list of city parks here
Guardian Angels Catholic School Chaska Curling Center
Southwest Christian High School  Chaska Town Course
St. John’s Lutheran School Chaska Valley Family Theater
The World Learner School Dahlgreen Golf Club
Hazeltine National Golf Club
Minnesota Lanscape Arboretum
World’s Largest Mustache

Faith Communities

Local Restaurants

Chaska Moravian Church Chaska City Diner
Christ Victorious Lutheran Church  Chaska My Love
Church on the Hill China Pagoda Restaurant
Crown of Glory Lutheran Church Crooked Pint Ale House
Cross of Grace Church Cuzzy’s Brick House
Guardian Angels Catholic Church Cy’s Bar and Grill
Meadow Spring Church  Detello’s Pizza
River Alliance Church Johnny’s
Shepherd of the Hill Presbyterian Church Pasta Zola
St. John’s Lutheran Patron Mexican Bar & Grill
Valley Evangelical Free Church Rising Dragon
Westbrook Community Church  Sake Sushi
Tommy’s Malt Shop

Latest Bathroom Trends and Features

According to a recent Houzz & Home survey, homeowners are investing more on bathroom renovations than in previous years, largely due to outdated designs and finishes. What types of upgrades are they spending money on? Here are some of the latest trends and tech updates being used in bathroom design.

Aesthetic Additions
You don’t have to tackle a full overhaul to make a big impact in the bathroom. Smaller changes can often bring big rewards, both from a resale perspective and by adding value to your daily experience.

Cosmetic favorites, according to the National Kitchen & Bath Association’s 2016 bathroom trends, include polished chrome finishes and neutral colors like white and gray. And bathrooms are becoming more streamlined with floating vanities, open shelving and undermount sinks. When larger changes are made, homeowners are incorporating amenities such as no-threshold showers and higher vanity heights that allow for aging in place.

Tech Touches
When you consider updating the appliances in your home, you may automatically think of doing so in the kitchen, living area or laundry room. Many, however, are quickly adopting technological advances in pursuit of the smart bathroom. Some of the more popular add-ons available include:

  • High-tech toilets: The most basic bathroom appliance now has seat-warming options, LED lights, motion sensors and automatic dryers.
  • Accessorized soaking tubs: You can take a basic bath, or you can soak in a chromotherapy tub with mood-enhanced lighting. Or enjoy an air bath, with massaging bubbles similar to a hot spring.
  • Digital faucets and showers: Along with reduced flow, which conserves water and money, faucet features also include touchless technology and programmable settings like a timed shower option.

Which market trends and tech updates appeal most to your family? When done well, these upgrades can improve your quality of life and increase the value of your home.


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Featured Image Photo Credit: “luxury-bathroom-design-axor-8-554×312” by home space © 2010 (CC BY-SA 2.0)